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How consultations work at our law firm.

Our first step in working with new clients is to arrange an initial consultation. The purpose of our initial consultations is for our attorneys to carefully review the history of new clients. We learn about the individual’s personal and immigration background, and other details that are legally relevant under U.S. immigration law. At the conclusion of a consultation, our attorney will offer individualized legal advice about the immigration strategies that may be available to the new client. We will also offer you an individualized price quote, in writing, for any legal work that we may be able to offer on your case.

The majority of our law firm’s work is done remotely with clients who work with us exclusively online. These consultations are conducted by Skype (or other similar platform if preferred by the client). We also offer consultations our offices in Tacoma, Redmond and Bellevue, Washington.

The cost of initial consultations with one of our immigration attorneys is $150. You are under no obligation to hire the firm for further legal work. If you decide to retain our firm within 7 days the full amount of your consultation fee is credited to your account with our firm.

To book a consultation use the easy calendar tool below to find a time that works best for your schedule. After booking the appointment you will receive detailed instructions on next steps.

Find a time that's best for you:


This Post Has 14 Comments
  1. Hello,

    I found your post regarding Administrative Processing. I found it really interesting, but I’m not sure which one really fits my situation.

    I’m the petitioner for a K-1 Visa, and they told us at the interview that our application was approved. After 5-10 days we saw on the website that our application was put on Administrative Processing for about a week now (about 4 working days). We were not given any documents at the interview at Manila. On speaking with the embassy they told us so far that there’s nothing requested as of now. I’m not entirely sure if we should be worried or how often we should check. Are cases like this starting to be more common as you mentioned in your post? In your experience, what is the time frame in cases like these get resolved?

    Many thanks,
    KL

  2. Hi,
    You were referred on an AMIGAs facebook post. I am a US attorney and I practice in Quito, Ecuador. I have a client who I believe is on a DOJ watchlist. I did all the FOIAs and the DHS TRIP. Client even went through congressional inquiry process. Her family members, including US citizens, are still being stopped and asked questions by CBP. Her and her husband would like a tourist visa to visit US Citizen family members. There may or may not be an actual inadmissibility here, but rather a mistake or confusion. However she did tll me about one concerning connection.
    Is this something you may be able to assist with?
    Thanks!
    Rebecca Rangel

    1. Hi, Rebecca and thanks for the message. We don’t focus on security-related work at the firm, but I can highly recommend Jay Gairon in the Seattle area (easily found via Google). I just presented with him this last week and learned even more about his expertise in the area. He’s basically unmatched.

  3. When booking a consultation, is it possible to provide your firm with a document with all the background information about our case. We are currently living in Dubai and our Skype connection is usually not very reliable, so if your associate has the info prior to our conversation, we could make sure our conversation is as efficient as possible. Thanks for your help.

    1. Hi, Tim. We have an intake form that gathers that information. But we’re also happy to receive additional written information from you if it would be helpful to guiding the discussion. Usually we have no problem with connections to Dubai, and we can always drop the video component if there is a bandwidth issue. But to date we’ve never had issues with Dubai.

  4. Hi Team/Greg,

    Currently my girlfriend is visiting from Thailand. She has been here for over 60 days and has her departing flight in 60 days from now. I want to propose and marry her here. If I do so, can she stay while we file for adjustment? Is this a situation where we will have to prove her intent? The alternative is to do a K1 visa, but that would mean a possible year apart. I would prefer to keep her here if this situation doesn’t propose much risk. I appreciate the help.
    -Luke

  5. I had been married in Ecuador with a U.S. Citizen for 17 years. I relinquished my green card 2 years ago.
    I would like to travel again to the USA and later apply for the Adjustment of status under my Visa Waiver Program(VWP). Is that possible? How long will get me to get the IR1 visa?

    1. Hi, Nico. Check out this post. You can’t enter the US on ESTA/VWP with plans to adjust status. Doing so is an act of fraud that can get you deported and permanently barred from the US. Instead, you’d want to look into consular processing. That has a long lead time (1+ year), so you’ll want to get the process started as soon as you’re committed to doing so.

  6. Hi
    This is vipul. Right now I am in f1 but I want to apply for u visa. Is that possible to apply.
    I was in my cousins store and on that time had robbery and I reported to police. They catch the guy and right now court hearing going on. I need som3 help.

    1. Hi, Vipul. At attorney would need to look at more details of the offense to see if this would qualify. You would have to meet the definition of a “victim” to get a U visa certification; if you were merely a witness this may or may not qualify.

  7. I provided your rate for Jim but he wondered if you might charge less since he has a quick list of questions which may take less than 15 minutes. It is regarding a new visa for a friend of his. He left a call number of 928-205-8880.

    1. Hi, Jim. Our consultation fee is actually already offered at a huge cost reduction from our lawyer’s normal hourly rate. Consultations are intended for prospective clients who are considering retaining the firm to assist with their immigration process. We have experimented in the past with offering 15 minute consultations. But our experience was that this almost never provided a good value to the client, since it was impossible to give meaningful advice in so short a period. Other law firms may take a different approach, but we don’t want to undertake a consultation – or anything else for a client – unless we can do an excellent job.

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